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Tuesday, March 22, 2016

COLORISM AFFECTS BLACK MEN TOO

Feeling Rebloggy
There is a tendency that I have noticed, that when dealing with issues of colorism, you would think that this issue does not affect Black men. While I can tell you from first hand experience that it does, I definitely understand why some Black men choose not to engage the topic.

Hottie Felon
Jeremy Meeks Photo Went Viral

OUT OF JAIL
MARCH 2016
INTO MODELING CONTRACT
 MARCH 2016 
I won’t re-tell to you some of the spiteful things that have been said to me as a dark-skinned fellow, because I don’t want to empower those mis-educated voices. I did have issues with self-perception due to my complexion, but thankfully I shed them as I got older. I have cut everybody loose who made me feel less than for the simple reason of what shade I am. That’s how I dealt with it.  But I can tell you that it was no cake-walk being my hue back in the day.
When you are regarded as more “dangerous” and menacing because of your skin shade, that ain’t a good feeling. It makes you at times go overboard to put people at ease around you
http://www.politeonsociety.com/2011/05/30/color-struck-the-politics-of-shade-in-the-black-community/




I wouldn’t deign to criticize another filmmaker’s voice or their hard work but as a dark-skinned black woman and someone whom [the film "Dark Girls"] would appear to represent, I have some reservations.

A number of filmmakers have explored black culture’s preoccupation with skin tone and hair texture, with mixed results. This includes Spike Lee’s School Daze, which featured a musical number with dark- and light-skinned black women fighting over “good” and “bad” hair, Chris Rock’s Good Hair, a comedic look at black women’s quest for straighter hair, andMy Nappy Roots: A Journey Through Black Hair-itage, by Regina Kimbell, an empowering film about black women struggling with and, ultimately embracing, their hair in all its varied glory.

Dark Girls (2011) by Bill Duke and D. Channsin Berry

It is interesting that while the issues around color and hair affect the lives of both black men and black women, the filmmakers tend to be male and the domain in which it is explored is female.



I don’t believe this is just because beauty is a uniquely female concern.

Instead, by framing the pathology and misery of the black experience in a female context, whether through derisive humor or with deep compassion, the male filmmakers are able to explore the topic from a comfortable distance.
This is the nature of male dominance, and it happens at the expense of black men exploring and healing their own pain.

READ MOREhttps://ohgeeproductions.wordpress.com/2011/05/27/will-dark-girls-address-colorism-on-the-backs-of-black-women/