Thursday, September 5, 2019

ON THIS DATE IN HISTORY: THE CENTRAL PARK FIVE WAS AWARDED 41 MILLION DOLLARS


Feeling Rebloggy 
This story was news 5 years ago today
The Central Park Five case is officially closed. 
A federal court judge on Friday signed off on the wrongfully-convicted quintet's $41 million settlement with the city, court records show. 
The deal "is an act of justice for those five men that is long overdue," Mayor de Blasio said in a statement after the filing... 
The five black and Latino men were teens when they....were coerced into confessing... [They] had all served their sentences when career criminal Matias Reyes confessed to the crime.  His story was backed up by DNA evidence, and a judge vacated their convictions with the blessing of the Manhattan District Attorney's office...

~Daily News

Read More: https://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/central-park-legal-battle-officially-article-1.1929270?


The miniseries about their lives was created by Ava DuVernay.
https://www.imdb.com/title/tt7137906/



Tuesday, March 26, 2019

ELLA BAKER

Feeling Rebloggy
Ella Baker began her involvement with the NAACP in 1940. She worked as a field secretary and then served as director of branches from 1943 until 1946.
Inspired by the historic bus boycott in Montgomery, Alabama, in 1955, Baker co-founded the organization In Friendship to raise money to fight against Jim Crow Laws in the deep South.
In 1957, Baker moved to Atlanta to help organize Martin Luther King's new organization, the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC). She also ran a voter registration campaign called the Crusade for Citizenship.
The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC)
  • On February 1, 1960, a group of black college students from North Carolina A&T University refused to leave a Woolworth's lunch counter in Greensboro, North Carolina where they had been denied service.
  • Baker left the SCLC after the Greensboro sit-ins. She wanted to assist the new student activists because she viewed young, emerging activists as a resource and an asset to the movement. Miss Baker organized a meeting at Shaw University for the student leaders of the sit-ins in April 1960. From that meeting, the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee -- SNCC -- was born 
  • Adopting the Gandhian theory of nonviolent direct action, SNCC members joined with activists from the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) to organize the 1961 Freedom Rides. 
  • In 1964 SNCC helped create Freedom Summer, an effort to focus national attention on Mississippi's racism and to register black voters.
~Ella Baker Center 

Janet Harmon Waterford Bragg: First Black Woman To Earn A Commercial Pilot's License

    A contemporary and colleague of Willa Brown, Janet Harmon Waterford Bragg was the first black woman to earn a commercial pilot’s license. She had to try a second time in Chicago because the examiner in Tuskegee, Alabama refused to issue a license to a “colored girl.” She was a founder and charter member of the Challenger Aero Club, which eventually led to the National Airmen’s Association of America and the Coffey School of Aeronautics.

     Bragg also promoted the field of aviation in the 1930s through a regular column in the Chicago Defender newspaper.
     Born the youngest of seven children in Georgia, Bragg moved to Illinois to live with her sister and work as a nurse after graduating from Spelman College. She decided that she wanted to learn to fly after seeing a billboard that read “Birds learn to fly. Why can’t you?” She was the only woman in a class with 24 black men at Curtiss Wright Aeronautical School in Chicago. The school was a ground school and had no means of offering flight training. She used the money she earned from working as a nurse to purchase a plane of her own and rent it out to other pilots.
     Since black pilots were restricted from using white airports, Bragg along with several of her classmates and aviation instructors formed the Challenger Aero Club and built an airfield in the all-black town of Robbins, Illinois. In 1931, the Challenger club began an annual flyover at Chicago’s Lincoln Cemetery to honor Bessie Coleman.
~The Fresh
Read More:
http://www.therefresh.co/2018/03/15/bessie-willa-and-janet-unsung-heroines-in-aviation-history/



Tuesday, March 19, 2019

Proto Feminist Daisy Bates As Civil Rights Leader

Feeling  Rebloggy 


When Daisy Bates was three years old her mother was killed by three white men. Although Bates, was just a child, her biological mother’s death made an emotional and mental imprint on her. The unfortunate death forced Bates to confront racism at an early age and pushed her to dedicate her life to ending racial injustice.
Daisy Bates was born in Huttig, Arkansas in 1914 and raised in a foster home. When she was fifteen, she met her future husband and began travelling with him throughout the South. The couple settled in Little Rock, Arkansas and started their own newspaper. The Arkansas Weeklywas one of the only African Americn newspapers solely dedicated to the Civil Rights Movement. The paper was circulated state wide. Bates not only worked as an editor, but also regularly contributed articles.
Naturally, Bates also worked with local Civil Rights organizations. For many years, she served as the President of the Arkansas chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP)....
[After Thurgood Marshall and other NAACP attorney's like feminist Pauli Murray helped him win Brown v The Board Of Education, the behavior of white people didn't change. Whites didn't jump up and willingly comply with the law willingly with their superiority at stake. 
One we had won the right to have the same quality schools, books, and supplies as white children, we had to fight at the local level to make white school boards comply with the new law of the land.] 
When the national NAACP office started to focus on Arkansas’ schools, they looked to Bates to plan the strategy. She took the reins and organized The Little Rock Nine.
Bates selected nine students to integrate Central High School in Little Rock in 1957. She regularly drove the students to school and worked tirelessly to ensure they were protected from violent crowds. [The newspaper she owned with her husband kept black support at their backs] She also advised the group and even joined the school’s parent organization.
Due to Bates’ role in the integration, she was often a target for intimidation. Rocks were thrown into her home several times and she received bullet shells in the mail. The threats [eventually] forced the Bates family to shut down their newspaper.
https://www.womenshistory.org/education-resources/biographies/daisy-bates 

Monday, March 18, 2019

REDUCING THE MYSTICAL PATH TO MORALITY TO SOMETHING MANAGEABLE

If we reduce the mystical Path ([Christian...]Kabbalistic, Taoist, etc) to nothing more then a way of becoming a more moral person, then we spit on the thousands of Sages and the millions of texts they spent their lives preparing for us. We wouldn't need all of these teachings for something so trivial to understand as building better moral and civic values, this only requires common sense.

The Path of Illumination is not a mere process of becoming a better thinker, a more ethical person or a civic leader, these things are side effects; the Path is about revealing the spiritual worlds concealed from us, to expand awareness and connection and grow to new degree of conscious evolution beyond the mere five senses, in fact it is to reveal a new higher sense of reality entirely.
If you're not aiming yourself toward this kind of illumination, you haven't understood what the [s]ages of the past are clearly telling us.
The All is not limited, It is infinite - so don't limit yourself or your experience. Demand more, push, grow, expand.
For those that scuff at this, and they are many, remember that their philosophies are produced by the very same limited mind that we're trying to move beyond. They have refused to Exodus from their ego thinking so now in their laziness they must also pull you down in fear and envy.
Don't fall for this - you are eternal and life is simply a game where you can learn to expand beyond the temporal, this is the only purpose of your life - to know (experience) more with each breath without limit.
You will become what you agree is possible; infinity is possible ?

~ Ty Raz Iyahu
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Mark 12:30 -31Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind and with all your strength.' The second is this: 'Love your neighbor as yourself.' There is no commandment greater than these

John 10:10The thief comes only to steal and kill and destroy; I have come that they may have life, and have it to the full.

Start your heart and thoughts in this place and move forward. See what's out there in the world for you!

MOVING!
JOIN ME HERE: https://www.facebook.com/BCALR/?

Sunday, March 17, 2019

JO ANN ROBINSON AND THE BLACK WOMEN INITIATED THE MONTGOMERY BUS BOYCOTT

   Feeling Rebloggy

     ...Soon after arriving in Montgomery, Robinson was verbally attacked by a public bus driver for sitting in the "whites only" section of the bus. When she became the WPC's president the following year, she made desegregating the city's buses one of the organization's top priorities.
     The WPC repeatedly complained to the Montgomery city leaders about unfair seating practices and abusive driver conduct. But the group's concerns were dismissed, leading Robinson to begin laying plans for a bus boycott by the city's African American community. Following Rosa Park's arrest in December 1955 for refusing to give up her bus seat to a white person, Robinson and a few associates jumped into action. They copied tens of thousands of leaflets and distributed them across the city, calling for a one-day boycott.
     Following the overwhelming success of the one-day boycott, Montgomery's black citizens decided to continue the campaign, establishing the Montgomery Improvement Association (MIA) to organize the effort and electing Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. as the MIA's president.

Walking by Charles Henry Alston. Walking recalls the bus boycotts in the 1950s and anticipated the civil rights marches of the 1960s. The work not only depicts the spirit and conviction of the civil rights protest, it also references the significant role of women and youth in the movement. 

Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, gift of Sydney Smith Gordon, © Charles Alston Estate. Object number 2007.2

https://nmaahc.si.edu/blog-post/jo-ann-robinson-heroine-montgomery-bus-boycott